Antioch University Film Screening in Seattle, Washington on March 22, 2014

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The screening for the Contemporary Social Issues series at Antioch University in Seattle, Washington on March 22, 2014 was a great success. Helen Yellowman and Angelo Baca presented the film and fielded questions after the film. Regrettably, director Nadine Zacharias was not able to attend via Skype as we strive to present and represent the film as accurately and correctly as possible as a shared project. However, she was busy with the YoungDok presentation in Germany and we also anticipate some great photos from that event sometime in the near future. I think that coordinating these things are challenging since Germany is so far away and the time difference is great but we do what we can!

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Helen Yellowman speaking to the crowd at Antioch University on March 22, 2014

The best part of the experience was sitting down with people after the screening and talking with them one-on-one with the audience after the event was over at a nearby cafe. It was good to take the time to know the people who came and speak with them in a more traditional Navajo way, especially with the presence of my grandmother who wanted to know who they all were. She did a beautiful job of visiting and talking as everyone there was very respectful listening and introducing themselves to her. Her presence reminded us all of the unity of family and how she so easily becomes everyone’s grandmother with everyone around her becoming her grandchildren. My admiration and awe grows each time I witness adults and young people alike become children right before our eyes near her.

Speaking with Shimasuni (grandmother) Helen Yellowman at dinner

Speaking with Shimasani (grandmother) Helen Yellowman at dinner

I want to thank Native Gathering Students at Antioch University in Seattle and Susan for organizing at Antioch University for doing a great job of putting the event on, being welcoming and warm hosts, and putting the word out to the community for the screening while getting us a nice space and providing food, even traditional blue corn mush! Thank you very much for all your hard work and “it is well” (ya’at’eeh).

“Standing on Sacred Ground” Film Series at Wesleyan University

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March 1 & 2 at Wesleyan University featured the “Standing on Sacred Ground” Film Series with director Christopher “Toby” McLeod (featured at the far left) who has been doing this project since the early 1990’s now sharing his films with the world by touring, screening, and conversing with various audiences. Filmmaker Angelo Baca was invited to participate on the panel commentating on the film and talking with the audiences during Q & A. Of course, we mentioned “Into America” as another film associated with indigenous peoples fighting for and trying to protect our traditional lands. This film series goes around the globe from the indigenous peoples of Papua New Guinea fighting to protect their waters to the tar sands of Alberta, from Russian shamans protecting their lands to the Winnemem Wintu fighting a dam project by the government, to Native Peruvians trying to keep their foods alive in the face of climate change and the Ethiopian tribal peoples attempting to keep their traditional ways and lands, to Aboriginal Australians and Native Hawaiians reclaiming traditional land and resisting the government and the military.

He is also known for his highly acclaimed film “In the Light of Reverence” also dealing with sacred site protection but specifically in the United States. Christopher traveled to many native communities and was willing to share his experiences with the audiences at Wesleyan and the panel of academics, traditional native people, and other filmmakers. It was an honor to participate with a great group of people on an excellent project. Now, more than ever, is the time for all of humanity to unite against the destruction of our sacred places, the natural world, and indigenous communities.

The discussions from the panel was fantastic and ranged on many topics from traditional native views, teachings, and culture of the land to academic perspectives of theory, philosophy, and modernity. The wide experiences and background made for interesting and rich conversation which included great input and feedback from the audience with their questions and comments. Our hosts were gracious, generous, and welcoming.

We want to thank the Wesleyan Film Studies Department, Department of Religion, Department of Anthropology, and everyone else who put this together whom I am sure are far too many to mention, including Toby and his supporters who helped fund his project and see it to fruition. Keep watch out for the film series as it will be shown on PBS some time in the near future.

 www.http://standingonsacredground.org/            www.http://www.sacredland.org/home/films/in-production/

American Indian Film Festival introduction of film to audience

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This short clip is from the American Indian Film Festival in San Francisco, California on Nov. 5th, 2013. It is the introduction to the documentary film “Into America: The Ancestor’s Land”, a collaboration between Nadine Zacharias and Angelo Baca.

American Indian Film Festival Photos

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American Indian Film Festival Photos

Saying ‘hello’ to the film festival audience, staff, programmers, and organizers. They did a fantastic job of putting this event together and making a great festival happen. My hats off to them for doing great work and putting impressive collections of indigenous films and people together!

American Indian Film Festival Meet-up Nov. 5th Noon Delancey Theatre

Hello All,

Angelo Baca, who is in the film with his grandmother, Helen Yellowman, will be at the American Indian Film Festival in San Francisco, California at the premiere of the November 5, 2013 screening at noon at the Delancey Street Theatre. He will be present to talk about the film, Question and Answer session about the film, and talk about the issues relevant to the film, and the process of the film’s development over the last few years.

We thank the American Indian Film Festival, the nation’s longest running and most prestigious Native American film institution, and all those involved for making this film screening possible and for the opportunity to be present and interact with the audience and the film festival programmers, hopefully even to some distributors! It is truly a unique and wonderful film festival for American Indians with a fantastic selection of indigenous stories and storytellers. Thank you!

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Contact Angelo Baca: angelo_baca@brown.edu